The American Civil War – The Way the Brits Saw It by Linda Nightingale ~ New Release: Her General in Gray

Please help me welcome fellow AHA author, Linda Nightingale, with an intersting article & a new release!

 

The American Civil War – The Way the Brits Saw It

Brit’s Eye View:  The Northern States denied the right of secession, claiming that the union was a “federal” one, in which case the attempt at separation is rebellion. The Southern States claimed that the Union was a “confederation” from which any member is entitled to separate itself. The British Government under Henry John Temple (3rd Viscount Palmerston) declined to judge between them.

Yet, popular sentiment was passionately divided. The violent feelings against slavery won many to the Union cause, but the political advocacy of the right of self-government won sympathy for the Confederacy from many another. Since the South fought against heavy odds, the sporting British people were drawn to the Confederacy.

Palmerston’s government was determined to maintain a strict neutrality. This, to most intents and purposes, it succeeded in doing though their cotton industry suffered direly. The blockades of the Southern ports cut off supplies of raw cotton upon which the Lancashire cotton industry was dependent. The cotton famine deprived many Lancashire operatives of their means of livelihood.

The Trent Affair increased sympathy with the South in England and very nearly involved Great Britain in the war. The Southerners dispatched two commissioners, one to England and one to France. The commissioners reached a neutral port and embarked on a British vessel, the Trent. A Union warship boarded The Trent and the commissioners were carried off. A declaration of war was only averted when President Lincoln gave way to the demands of the British Government and released the commissioners.

Yet, the Union had cause for complaint. Ships were built and fitted out in British docks and sailed from British ports with apparently harmless intent, to be employed as cruisers by the Confederates, having been cleverly concealed. The most notorious instance was the Alabama. The British Government flatly repudiated the charge that it did not display due diligence in preventing such action. When the war ended with the Union the victor, claims were brought for damages done by the cruisers.

If Britain had entered the war on the side of the South, how might history have been different!

Her General in Gray was inspired by the Ghost & Mrs. Muir, not by the Civil War.  Here is the blurb and a short excerpt.  See what you think of this Confederate General.

BLURB:

Autumn Hartley purchases Allen Hall at a steal, but the northern lass gets far more than a beautiful plantation in the South Carolina Low Country. The house comes complete with its own ghost, a handsome and charming Civil War General—for the Confederacy. The stage is set for another civil conflict.

John Sibley Allen died in battle from a wound in the back, the bullet fired by the turncoat, Beauregard Dudley. The traitor’s reincarnation is Autumn the Interloper’s first dinner guest. Sib bedevils her date and annoys her with fleeting, phantom touches, certain he can frighten her away as he did previous purchasers. As time marches on, her resident ghost becomes more appealing while her suitor, Beau, pales in comparison. Autumn finds her ability to love didn’t perish in the divorce that sent her south seeking a fresh start.

After over a century in the hereafter, Sib discovers he is falling for none other than the feisty Yankee girl, but what future could a modern woman and an old-fashioned ghost possibly hope for?

EXCERPT:

“Did you have slaves, General Allen?”

“I did, Miss Hartley. They were an extended part of my family. None left the plantation when the war began. Unfortunately, I was killed in battle, as were my other two brothers, and they were forced to accept freedom. My estranged brother inherited and basically sent them packing with no more than the clothes on their backs. Perhaps Hell is his new habitat.”

“Why are you still here?” She glanced around the room.  “I mean why didn’t you go wherever dead people go?”

He laughed.  “To torment you, I suppose.”

“You’re doing that grandly.” She flung a shooing gesture.  “Leave.  I’ve no need of a ghostly…whatever.”

“I’m not a whatever, Miss Hartley. This is my house, and you’re the intruder—along with the coward who murdered me.” He removed his coat, hanging it on the back of a chair. “With all due respect, I take offense to your tone and the fact that you served Beauregard on my mother’s fine china.  She loved those pieces.”

“I’m the intruder? You’re dead. You have no claim on this place.” She braced her hands on her hips, glaring at the arrogant spirit.

Buy Links:

https://www.amazon.com/Her-General-Gray-Linda-Nightingale-ebook/dp/B06W9HFMBM/

http://catalog.thewildrosepress.com/

 

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16 Comments

Filed under Author Blog Post, New Release

16 responses to “The American Civil War – The Way the Brits Saw It by Linda Nightingale ~ New Release: Her General in Gray

  1. Thanks for hosting, Alicia!

    Like

  2. Loved the excerpt! Congrats on your release!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Love the excerpt. It just went on my TBR pile.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Love the excerpt! Congrats on your new release!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I love the post, and the premise of your book is so interesting!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. pamelasthibodeaux

    Sounds like another great book, Linda!
    Good luck and God’s blessings with it
    PamT

    Liked by 1 person

  7. liztyner

    Fascinating!!! I’d never thought about the British view of the American Civil War or thought them involved. I’ve also watched The Ghost and Mrs. Muir and enjoyed it! Her General in Gray sounds Great!

    Like

  8. Interesting post and I enjoyed the excerpt. Best of luck with your new release!

    Liked by 1 person

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