Tag Archives: Twitter tips

Tuesday Two-Minute Writing Tip – Making the Most of Twitter

Got two minutes? Then check out this week’s quick tip ~ A list of handy Twitter tips

Hello and welcome…I am a freelance editor and an editor for The Wild Rose Press, as well as an author. I often struggle with my own writing, and I have found that sometimes, a little reminder of ways to improve the process can be helpful, so, I like to share these moments of brilliance with others :). But, in this busy world of ours, who has time for pages and pages of writing tips? That’s why I’ve condensed mine down to quick flashes you can read in (approximately) two minutes. Enjoy…

TWoMinuteTip

Disclaimer: All of my tips are suggestions, and are only my opinion. And, for the most part, there are exceptions when going against my advice will make your story read better. Take what works, leave the rest.

 

Tips to get noticed, get retweets, gain followers, or to simply make your Twitter life easier:

  • Although Twitter allows 140 characters, it’s best to not use them all. Shorter tweets are more effective.
  • As everyone knows by now, tweets with images get more notice
  • Ask people to retweet you. The most effective way is to simply add: Please Retweet
  • Use no more than TWO hashtags. More looks spammy
  • Size matters… Images that are smaller than 440 x 222 will not show up in your timeline, only a link to the image does. The max image size is 3MB
  • If you do not want people to tag you without your permission, you can go to your Twitter Privacy settings and specify the tagging you wish to allow. You can remove tags by going to the … ‘more’ beneath a tweet and select ‘remove tag from photo’
  • Use #tweetchat to set up chats by using an exclusive hashtag. I haven’t tried this yet, but I’m going to. Worth a shot, right? http://tweetchat.com/
  • This is more than just a Twitter tip. I’m not sure I understand exactly, but from what I’ve read, it’s worth checking into. It is a service that you can use to trigger actions throughout various web/social media services. It’s more than just linking Facebook and Twitter. There seems to be a number of amazing things you can do with it. IFTTT http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2424077,00.asp
  • Did you know Twitter backs up everything you tweet? In settings there is a “Request your archive” option. You will receive an email containing a link to download a ZIP file of your tweets.
  • Track the clicks you get on links you share. Many sites provide this service, for example, Clicktotweet provides full analytics on clicks from your followers. You can also click the Gear icon on Twitter.com and select “Twitter Ads” for a quick look at how many people clicked the links in your recent tweets.
  • To share an image of a tweet on other social media outlets, or blogs, etc, use the ‘embed’ feature. Click on … more and choose ‘embed’ to get the code.   
  • Direct link to FB post or Tweet –  Click the ‘more’ and an option to ‘copy link to tweet’ will come up.
  • Retweet for others frequently. The more you do, the more others are likely to RT you.
  • If you wish to add an image to a composed tweet so that, when others share the tweet (copy and paste the content, not share a link), an image will appear, you’ll want to use Hoosuite. (A tip…I always try to keep all my links somewhere to refer to. Once you have an image link, you can use it over and over again.) Send out a tweet containing the image. Go to Hootsuite and find the tweet in your feed. Below the tweet, find the ‘retweet’ option and click on the drop down arrow. An option will come up to ‘edit.’ Choose that option and your tweet will appear in a box at the top of the page. The very last link in that box should be your image link. Copy that and insert it into a tweet and the image should show up.
  • Find and gain more followers by using http://twiends.com/home
  • Tweet the same content multiple times. The lifespan of a tweet is about 18 minutes. To increase the likelihood of a tweet being seen, tweet out the same tweet multiple times in one day. I wouldn’t do this to several tweets, but if there is something in particular you want to be seen, focus on tweeting it several times. This is when Buffer and Hootsuite will come in handy. You’ll need to make some minor tweaks so you won’t get a message that you’ve already sent that tweet. 
  • Add questions in your retweets and/or tweets to increase engagement and visibility. You can also create polls for more interaction. 
  • I’ll end with a list of the most retweetable words:

You

Twitter

Please

ReTweet

Post

Blog

Social

Free

Media

Help

Please retweet

Great

Social Media

10

Follow

How to

Top

Blog post

Check out

New blog post

(words to avoid, for some reason, ‘Game’, ‘going’, ‘haha’ and ‘lol’)

Until next time…Happy Tweeting!

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

ONLY 99 cents!! 

(Click on the cover to be taken to the Amazon Buy Page)

2 minute writing tip final

 

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*** If you would like to send me a few sample pages (around 7500 words or so, even though I will not edit that many on the blog. It just gives me more to choose from) for me to edit and share on an upcoming blog post, please do so in the body of an email to AliciaMDean@aol.com. Please use the subject line: “Blog Submission” This is for published or unpublished authors. In the email, please include whether you would like me to use your name or keep it anonymous, and whether or not you would like me to include any contact info or buy info for your books. Also, you can let me know if you would like for me to run my edits by you before posting on the blog. Please keep in mind, this is for samples to use for blog posts. I will not edit or use samples from all the submissions I receive, but I will use as many as possible. 

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16

How to write a novel? That is the question. There are probably as many answers to that question as there are people who ask it.

Wanting to write and actually doing it are two very different things. I am well acquainted with the sometimes grueling process of churning out a story. Over the years, I have tried many methods for creating and completing manuscripts, and have tweaked and honed it down to a workable (for me) process.

Using specific examples from one of my own novels, Without Mercy, I share my method in this mini how to book. The first eight steps actually deal with plotting while the last two are designed to help expand your outline into a well-developed draft. There is no one, perfect way to create a story, but there will be a method, or methods that work for you. I’m not sure if this is the one, but it works for me. Only you can decide if it also works for you. Fingers crossed that it does!

*** Warning – Please do not purchase without reading a sample. (This is solid advice for any book, fiction or non. If you are not intrigued in the sample, you will likely not enjoy the book)

Amazon: Click Here

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8 Comments

Filed under For Writers, Promo Tips, Tips from an Editor, Tuesday Two-Minute Tips

Tuesday Two-Minute Writing Tip – Miscellaneous Tips You Can’t Live Without

Got two minutes? Then check out this week’s quick tip ~ A handful of editing, writing, and marketing tips to make your life easier…

Hello and welcome…I am a freelance editor and an editor for The Wild Rose Press, as well as an author. I often struggle with my own writing, and I have found that sometimes, a little reminder of ways to improve the process can be helpful, so, I like to share these moments of brilliance with others :). But, in this busy world of ours, who has time for pages and pages of writing tips? That’s why I’ve condensed mine down to quick flashes you can read in (approximately) two minutes. Enjoy…

TWoMinuteTip

Disclaimer: All of my tips are suggestions, and are only my opinion. And, for the most part, there are exceptions when going against my advice will make your story read better. Take what works, leave the rest.

Here are a few things I’ve learned along the way that have been helpful to me, and I’m hoping they will be to you also…

Writing Habit:

I know it’s very difficult to carve out writing time each day. Writers need a large chunk of time to be ‘in the zone’ and undisturbed. However, if you want to work toward a habit of writing each day, try to make yourself write one paragraph a day. The advantages are…

  • At least you’re writing SOMETHING, and a trickle can become a stream
  • You might be surprised at how much more than just that one paragraph you are able to write
  • If you’re like me and you have scene notes but don’t have a good handle on exactly how the scene will play out, writing a paragraph about what you DO know can serve as a placeholder and when you go back later, your scene might flow. Or you might determine it should be cut. Either way, you can resolve that particular scene. If you keep doing this, you can build a nice outline for your novel

‘Word’ tips:

I’m sure you’ve all seen those squiggly blue and red lines that indicate, according to ‘Word,’ you’ve made a booboo? Did you know that there is an option where you can actually be taken to each of these potential errors? Under ‘Review’ you should see an option for ‘ABC ✔ Spelling and Grammar.’ If you click on that, it will take you to each instance of errors and you will have the option to correct them or ignore. It doesn’t find ALL typos and mistakes, but it finds many.

Word also has a ‘Compare’ function in the Review section that comes in handy if you can’t recall which version of two documents is the most recent, or if, for any reason, you wish to compare the differences in two documents. Once you click on ‘compare’ it’s self-explanatory.

Facebook and Twitter:

When you draft a Facebook post, before actually posting, you can delete the actual link and just leave the content and image to make your post look a bit ‘cleaner’ and the option to click on where the link leads will remain in your post.

You can schedule posts  to your ‘page’ ahead of time on Facebook. Once you draft a post, click on the arrow next to ‘publish’ found beneath your content box. An option for scheduling will come up. You can schedule a week’s worth of posts at one sitting.

You can embed tweets for sharing rather than screen-shotting them. Beneath your tweet, you will see the … option. If you click on that, one of the options that comes up is to ’embed’ your tweet. Copy and paste that link.

If you wish to share a link for a Facebook post or a Tweet, you can get a direct link by clicking on the time/day of the post/tweet. A new page will come up that will contain the direct link in the search bar. Copy and paste. This is handy if you want to ask others to share a tweet or post for you, or if you want to, say post a link from your fan page into your profile page, etc.

That’s it for now…just a few little bite-sized tips. Hope you find them useful!

Until next time…happy writing!

 ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

NEW RELEASE – Now Available 

(Click on the cover to be taken to the Amazon Buy Page)

2 minute writing tip final

 

 ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

*** If you would like to send me a few sample pages (around 7500 words or so, even though I will not edit that many on the blog. It just gives me more to choose from) for me to edit and share on an upcoming blog post, please do so in the body of an email to AliciaMDean@aol.com. Please use the subject line: “Blog Submission” This is for published or unpublished authors. In the email, please include whether you would like me to use your name or keep it anonymous, and whether or not you would like me to include any contact info or buy info for your books. Also, you can let me know if you would like for me to run my edits by you before posting on the blog. Please keep in mind, this is for samples to use for blog posts. I will not edit or use samples from all the submissions I receive, but I will use as many as possible. 

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

16

How to write a novel? That is the question. There are probably as many answers to that question as there are people who ask it.

Wanting to write and actually doing it are two very different things. I am well acquainted with the sometimes grueling process of churning out a story. Over the years, I have tried many methods for creating and completing manuscripts, and have tweaked and honed it down to a workable (for me) process.

Using specific examples from one of my own novels, Without Mercy, I share my method in this mini how to book. The first eight steps actually deal with plotting while the last two are designed to help expand your outline into a well-developed draft. There is no one, perfect way to create a story, but there will be a method, or methods that work for you. I’m not sure if this is the one, but it works for me. Only you can decide if it also works for you. Fingers crossed that it does!

*** Warning – Please do not purchase without reading a sample. (This is solid advice for any book, fiction or non. If you are not intrigued in the sample, you will likely not enjoy the book)

Amazon: Click Here

5 Comments

Filed under For Writers, Promo Tips, Tips from an Editor, Tuesday Two-Minute Tips

Tuesday Two-Minute Writing/Promo Tip – Fourteen Handy Twitter Tips

Got two minutes? Then check out this week’s quick tip ~ 14 ways to get noticed on Twitter

Hello and welcome…I am a freelance editor and an editor for The Wild Rose Press, as well as an author. I often struggle with my own writing, and I have found that sometimes, a little reminder of ways to improve the process can be helpful, so, I like to share these moments of brilliance with others :). But, in this busy world of ours, who has time for pages and pages of writing tips? That’s why I’ve condensed mine down to quick flashes you can read in (approximately) two minutes. Enjoy…

TWoMinuteTip

Disclaimer: All of my tips are suggestions, and are only my opinion. And, for the most part, there are exceptions when going against my advice will make your story read better. Take what works, leave the rest.

I thought I would take a break from the writing tips and share some handy Twitter tips I’ve learned along the way. Twitter is one of the most popular and easiest/quickets social media formats. But, with the countless tweets going out every second of every day, it’s difficult to get noticed. Repetition is the key. You might have to send out 20 tweets to get one of them noticed. You don’t want to ‘spam’ and constantly toot your own horn, but there are other ways to increase your odds of getting noticed, and I have listed some tips below to help make that happen, and to help make your Twitter Life a little simpler…

  1. Add fun little pics/symbols to your tweet. Copy and paste from here: http://www.symbols-n-emoticons.com/2013/05/new-symbols-for-facebook-comments.html
  2. When you would like to ask others to tweet for you, rather than composing a tweet for them to copy and paste, provide them a direct link to your tweet that they can simply RT (retweet). The more RT’s your tweet gets, the more noticeable it will be. Here is how: Go to the three dots … (more) beneath your tweet. (Or beneath any tweet you want to share with others) It will bring up options. One is ‘Copy link to tweet’ If you click on that, you can copy the link, which will be a direct link to your tweet, and share it with others who can then retweet you.
  3. Look to the left side of Twitter and find ‘Trending hashtags’ and try to incorporate them naturally into your tweet. It’s advisable to find out what the hashtag really means so that you use it correctly. 
  4. Use no more than 2 or 3 hashtags per tweet to prevent your tweet from appearing to be spam. 
  5. Since you are limited to 140 characters, you can create an image and add text, so that you can say more than you can in just your tweet. But, you don’t want to overdo it and have lengthy wording in your image. Less is more.  You can add quotes from your book, brief snippets from reviews, tag lines, etc. For example: WITHOUTMERCYteaser#1
  6. Speaking of images, tweets with images are more likely to be noticed. You can easily add text to an image by using sites like this: http://ipiccy.com/ http://www.online-image-editor.com/ (You can also resize your image on this site)
  7. Speaking of resizing…I’ve found the best size to use for Twitter images is 200 x 300.
  8. Use exclamation points, capitalization and quotation marks (but not all in the same tweet), to help get your tweet noticed. But, as always, less is more. I don’t advise doing all of that in the same tweet.  For example, do not do this: “A DYNAMITE READ THAT WILL LEAVE YOU GASPING!!!!” STEPHEN KING’S THE SHINING IS A #MUSTREAD!!!!!!!!!!!!!! But you could do this: “A dynamite read that will leave you gasping” Stephen King’s THE SHINING is a #MustRead Or A dynamite read that will leave you gasping!!!! Stephen King’s THE SHINING is a #MustRead
  9. If you are searching a hashtag or particular subject and you put the words in the search (or click on the hashtag) to bring up all tweets containing that word or hashtag, be sure to go up toward the top of the page that comes up. You will see a few choices such as ‘top’ and ‘live.’ ‘Top’ is where you will find the most popular tweets containing your search criteria, and ‘live’ should bring up all tweets containing it.
  10. Rather than just tweeting, retweet for others and interact, reply, compliment them.
  11. If you use punctuation in a hashtag, it breaks up the hashtag so that only the first part shows as part of the HT. For example, if I used: #Alicia’sBlog – Only this much would show as a hashtag: #Alicia and ‘sBlog would not show up as part of the HT.
  12. Ask for retweets. You’d be surprised at how many people RT just because you ask. 
  13. Create a Hashtag specific to your book (Mine might be #LibertyEmpoweredBook)  
  14. You can pin a tweet so that it is the one that always shows up when someone goes to your profile. Just click the … (more) beneath your tweet and the option will come up

Until next time…happy tweeting and Happy New Year!

(Here are a ton of hashtags you might want to utilize)

Tuesday: #TeaserTuesday

Wednesday: #WriterWednesday

#1LineWed

And WWWBlogs WomenWriterBlogs

#SampleSunday

#AmReading

#Books
#BookWorm

#LovetoRead
#GreatReads
#ShortStory

#Ebook

#Fiction

#blog

#FridayReads

#Goodreads

#IndieThursday
#MustRead
#Kindle

#Novel
#Paperbacks
#Storytelling
#WhatToRead
#WriterWednesday

#1LineWed

#Reading

#Readers

#BookLover

#Share

#RT

#BookShare

#99c (to offer or pick up an eBook bargain)
#AuthorRT
#BookGiveaway
#BookMarketing
#FollowFriday
#FreebieFriday
#FreeReads
#Novelines or NovelLines (to quote your own work)

#SundayShoutout

GENRE

#sweetromance

#cleanreadbookclub
#140Poem
#Crime
#Comedy
#DarkFantasy
#Dystopian
#Erotica
#HistFic
#Historical
#FaithLitChat
#KidLitChat
#Literature
#LitFic
#MemoirChat
#MGLit (middle grades literature)
#Mystery
#NonFiction
#Paranormal
#Poetry
#PoetryMonth (Each April in the USA)
#Romantic
#RomanticSuspence
#TrueStories
#ScienceFiction
#SciFiChat
#ShortStory
#SteamPunk
#Suspense
#UrbanFantasy
#WomensFiction
#YA
#YALit

Here are some hashtags you might find useful for yourself:

Book Industry News and Publishing Tips Hashtags

#AskAgent
#AskAuthor
#AskEditor
#BookMarket
#BookMarketing
#GetPublished
#IAN1 (Independent Author Network)
#IndiePub
#PromoTip
#Publishing
#SelfPublishing
#WriteTip
#WritingTip

Hashtags to Connect With Other Writers

#1K1H (write one thousand words in one hour)
#AmWriting
#AmEditing
#AmRevising
#CopyWriting
#EditGoal
#Editing
#IndieAuthor
#MyWANA (writer’s community created by Kirsten Lamb)
#NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month is held every November)
#RomanceWriter
#ScriptChat
#WIP
#WordCount
#WriteChat
#WriteGoal
#WriteMotivation
#WritersLIfe
#WriterWednesday
#Writing
#WritingBlitz
#WritingPrompt
#WritersBlock
#WroteToday
#WW

ePublishing and eBooks

#Amazon
#eBook
#BookBuzzr
#eReaders
#ePubChat
#iPad
#Kindle
#KindleBargain
#Kobo
#KDP (Kindle Direct Publishing)
#Nook
#Pubit
#SmashWords
#Sony
#Webfic

*** If you would like to send me a few sample pages (around 7500 words or so, even though I will not edit that many on the blog. It just gives me more to choose from) for me to edit and share on an upcoming blog post, please do so in the body of an email to AliciaMDean@aol.com. Please use the subject line: “Blog Submission” This is for published or unpublished authors. In the email, please include whether you would like me to use your name or keep it anonymous, and whether or not you would like me to include any contact info or buy info for your books. Also, you can let me know if you would like for me to run my edits by you before posting on the blog. Please keep in mind, this is for samples to use for blog posts. I will not edit or use samples from all the submissions I receive, but I will use as many as possible. 

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#FREE on Kindle Unlimited…

16

How to write a novel? That is the question. There are probably as many answers to that question as there are people who ask it.

Wanting to write and actually doing it are two very different things. I am well acquainted with the sometimes grueling process of churning out a story. Over the years, I have tried many methods for creating and completing manuscripts, and have tweaked and honed it down to a workable (for me) process.

Using specific examples from one of my own novels, Without Mercy, I share my method in this mini how to book. The first eight steps actually deal with plotting while the last two are designed to help expand your outline into a well-developed draft. There is no one, perfect way to create a story, but there will be a method, or methods that work for you. I’m not sure if this is the one, but it works for me. Only you can decide if it also works for you. Fingers crossed that it does!

*** Warning – Please do not purchase without reading a sample. (This is solid advice for any book, fiction or non. If you are not intrigued in the sample, you will likely not enjoy the book)

Amazon: Click Here

26 Comments

Filed under For Writers, Promo Tips, Tips from an Editor